History Courses

Courses in history (designated HIST) may be applied as appropriate (according to individual program requirements) toward

  • the general education requirements in the arts and humanities
  • a major in East Asian studies (select courses only), history, or humanities
  • a minor in East Asian studies, history, or women’s studies
  • electives

Western Civilization I (3 Credits, HIST 141)

Recommended: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. A survey of the history of Western civilization from antiquity through the Reformation. The objective is to chart major societal changes; identify major conflicts and wars; describe the evolution of religions; and recognize how philosophy and the arts reflect and influence peoples’ lives, cultures, and societies. The political, social, and intellectual developments that formed the values and institutions of the Western world are examined.

Western Civilization II (3 Credits, HIST 142)

Recommended: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. A survey of the history of Western civilization from the Reformation to modern times. The goal is to chart major societal changes; identify major conflicts and wars; describe the evolution of religions; and recognize how philosophy and the arts reflect and influence peoples’ lives, cultures, and societies.

History of the United States to 1865 (3 Credits, HIST 156)

A survey of the United States from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. The establishment and development of national institutions are traced. The aim is to locate, evaluate, and use primary and secondary sources and interpret current events and ideas in a historical context. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HIST 156 or HUMN 119.

History of the United States Since 1865 (3 Credits, HIST 157)

A survey of economic, intellectual, political, and social developments since the Civil War. The objective is to use primary and secondary sources to describe U.S. historical events and interpret current events and ideas in a historical context. Discussion covers the rise of industry and the emergence of the United States as a world power. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: HIST 157 or HUMN 120.

The United States in World Affairs (3 Credits, HIST 266)

A study of the United States as an emerging world power and of the domestic response to the nation’s changing status in world affairs. Emphasis is on the relationship between the internal and the external development of the nation.

Historical Methods (3 Credits, HIST 289)

Prerequisite: A 100-level HIST course. An introduction to historical methods, approaches, and techniques. The goal is to explain what history is and why it matters, identify historical paradigms, and employ the moral and ethical standards of the historical profession. Focus is on the philosophical and practical skills employed by historians.

Historical Writing (3 Credits, HIST 309)

Prerequisite: HIST 289. A study of the historical research and writing process. The goal is to construct a framework for an original historical research project, locate and evaluate source materials, and demonstrate proficiency in research methods.

Ancient Greece and Rome (3 Credits, HIST 321)

Prerequisite: Any writing course. An examination of the history of ancient Greece and Rome from 800 BC to 476 CE. The goal is to examine primary and secondary sources to explore and analyze Greek and Roman thought, institutions, and culture and demonstrate their influences on the modern world.

Europe’s Bloodiest Century (3 Credits, HIST 337)

An investigation of the political, economic, and cultural development of Europe since 1914, with emphasis on the factors involved in the two world wars and their worldwide effects and significance. The objective is to evaluate causes, courses, and consequences of armed conflicts in Europe during the 20th century to interpret their effects on contemporary society.

Recent America: 1945 to the Present (3 Credits, HIST 365)

Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. An investigation of U.S. history from the end of World War II to the events of September 11, 2001. The goal is to identify events, individuals, movements, and technological developments; synthesize primary and secondary resources; and analyze the significance of social, cultural, and political events. Topics include social turmoil, the Cultural Revolution, the role of the United States in the world, economic trends, military conflicts, consumerism, political and public scandals, and globalization.

America in the 20th Century (3 Credits, HIST 370)

Prerequisite: Any writing course. An examination of the emergence of institutions in the United States from 1900 to the end of the 20th century. The goal is to examine primary and secondary sources to explore and analyze how events, individuals, movements, and technological developments shaped modern America.

African American History (3 Credits, HIST 373)

Prerequisite: Any writing course. An examination of the history of African Americans in the United States from the colonial period to the end of the 20th century. The relationship between race and significant developments in American history (including slavery, war, industrialization, urbanization, technology, and culture) is evaluated. The goal is to examine primary and secondary sources to explore and analyze the historical experiences of African Americans and the ways in which race has shaped U.S. society.

America in Vietnam (3 Credits, HIST 381)

Prerequisite: A writing course. Recommended: WRTG 291. An examination of the complexity of the lengthy involvement of the United States in Vietnam. The goal is to engage in divergent historical interpretations and develop personal conclusions and perspectives about America’s role in Vietnam and its legacy. Discussion covers the social, cultural, political, and military dimensions of the Vietnam War, beginning with the declaration of Vietnamese independence at the conclusion of World War II. Emphasis is on the influence of the media in shaping government policy and public opinion. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BEHS 337 or HIST 381.

History of Islam and the Middle East (3 Credits, HIST 395)

Prerequisite: Any writing course. An examination of the origins and development of Islam and its impact in shaping the history of the Middle East from 700 CE to the 20th century. The goal is to examine primary and secondary sources to explore and analyze the diversity of Islamic beliefs; the evolution of social, political, economic, and cultural institutions; and the major trends that influence contemporary Middle Eastern societies.

World War II (3 Credits, HIST 465)

An investigation of the nature of the Second World War. The aim is to analyze the factors that contributed to World War II, investigate the influences of war-time ideologies, and examine how warfare accelerated advances in science and technology. Topics include the origins of the war; the political, military, economic, and social circumstances of the war and their impact and legacy; and the extent to which the war changed the world that we live in.