English Courses

Courses in English (designated ENGL) may be applied as appropriate (according to individual program requirements) toward

  • the general education requirement in the arts and humanities
  • a major in English or humanities
  • a minor in English or women’s studies
  • electives

Composition and Literature (3 Credits, ENGL 102)

(Fulfills the general education requirements in communications or arts and humanities.) Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. Further practice in writing using readings in literature. Focus is on academic writing forms, especially critical analysis of literature through a variety of modes such as comparison and contrast, classification, and causal analysis. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ENGL 102 or ENGL 292.

Introduction to Mythology (3 Credits, ENGL 103)

(Formerly HUMN 103.) A foundation in ancient mythology, focusing on Greek and Roman myths. Discussion may also cover Norse, Irish, Chinese, Arabic, and Hindu myths, among others. Emphasis is on examining various classical myths as expressed through plays, poems, and stories. The objective is to demonstrate an understanding of the differences between myths, legends, and other similar genres and show how classical world mythology still influences contemporary society. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ENGL 103 or HUMN 103.

Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama (3 Credits, ENGL 240)

Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. An introduction to fiction, poetry, and drama, with an emphasis on developing critical reading and writing skills. The objective is to identify and define elements of literature and literary genres, analyze literary texts using principles of close reading, and demonstrate skill in academic writing. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ENGL 240 or ENGL 340.

Standard English Grammar (3 Credits, ENGL 281)

(Formerly WRTG 288. Fulfills the general education requirement in communications but is not a writing course.) Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. An overview of standard edited English, a standard central to academic and professional communications. The aim is to write clear, effective prose consistent with the writer’s goals. Topics include applying advanced grammatical and linguistic descriptions and prescriptions and attending to the needs of diverse audiences while making writing and editing decisions. Tasks focus on parts of speech, sentence patterns, and sentence transformations. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ENGL 281, ENGL 281X, or WRTG 288.

Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry, Creative Nonfiction, and Fiction (3 Credits, ENGL 294)

Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. An introductory survey and practical study of key aspects of literary writing in poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction. The objective is to write original poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction and to critique, revise, and edit that writing. Emphasis is on reading and thinking critically and analytically from a writer’s perspective as a means to better understand the art and craft of creative writing. Discussion may cover publishing. Peer review of manuscripts may be included.

Critical Approaches to Literature (3 Credits, ENGL 303)

(Designed as a foundation for other upper-level literature courses.) Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. A study of the techniques of literary criticism emphasizing close reading, critical thinking, and critical writing. The goal is to apply a variety of theoretical approaches to literature, analyze texts, and create professional written communications.

Renaissance Literature (3 Credits, ENGL 310)

Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. An exploration of the cultural attitudes and values that separate the Middle Ages from the Renaissance, highlighting the changing role and purpose of the writer. The goal is to locate and evaluate appropriate sources, create professional written communications, and apply MLA documentation to written work. Major authors may include Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare.

19th-Century British Literature (3 Credits, ENGL 312)

Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. A study of representative authors and works in British literature from 1800 to 1900. The goal is to evaluate and synthesize source materials; create professional written communications; and gain a historical perspective through analysis of race, class, and gender issues. The works of representative writers (such as William Blake, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, and Oscar Wilde) are explored.

Shakespeare Studies (3 Credits, ENGL 406)

Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. An intensive study of Shakespeare’s work and its continuing relevance with reference to historically specific social and cultural contexts. The objective is to evaluate and synthesize source materials, apply critical theory, and demonstrate understanding of dramatic text. Histories, comedies, tragedies, romances, and sonnets may be examined. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: ENGL 406 or HUMN 440.

Major American Writers (1–3 Credits, ENGL 439)

Prerequisite: WRTG 101 or WRTG 101S. A study of works by selected American authors from the colonial period to the present. The goal is to understand the place these authors and their works hold in the canon of American literature. Emphasis is on the impact of historical and social events, as well as biographical influences, on the literature. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits when topics differ.