Criminology/Criminal Justice Courses

Courses in criminology/criminal justice (designated CCJS) may be applied as appropriate (according to individual program requirements) toward

  • the general education requirement in the behavioral and social sciences (Note: Only CCJS 100, 105, 350, 360, and 461 apply)
  • a major in criminal justice, computer networks and cybersecurity, or cybersecurity management and policy
  • a minor in criminal justice
  • electives

Students who previously received credit for courses in the disciplines of criminology (courses designated CRIM) or criminal justice (courses designated CJUS) may not receive credit for comparable courses designated CCJS.

Introduction to Criminology (3 Credits, CCJS 105)

(Fulfills the general education requirement in behavioral and social sciences.) An overview of the major elements of the criminological enterprise. The objective is to classify and analyze different crime trends and patterns, analyze criminological theories, and conduct research. Topics include the nature of criminology, criminological methods, crime causation, and characteristics of types of crimes and offenders. The police, courts, and corrections and the effects of the criminal justice system in society are also examined.

Criminal Law in Action (3 Credits, CCJS 230)

Recommended: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. A study of the history, nature, sources, and types of criminal law. The objective is to identify the elements of crime, recognize parties to crime, and explain the historical development of criminal law and punishment in the United States. Topics include behavioral and legal aspects of criminal acts and the classification and analysis of select criminal offenses. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 230 or CJUS 230.

Criminal Procedure and Evidence (3 Credits, CCJS 234)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100, CCJS 101, or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 230. A study of the general principles and theories of criminal procedure and evidence. The goal is to interpret statutes and case law, identify relevant issues, and evaluate the integrity and admissibility of evidence. Topics include due process, arrest, search and seizure, and the evaluation of evidence and proof. Recent developments in the field are discussed.

Intelligence-Led Policing (3 Credits, CCJS 311)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. An examination of intelligence-related processes as they apply to domestic law enforcement. The aim is to identify, collect, and assess data and process that information into intelligence that can support strategic and tactical planning. Intelligence reports are reviewed and assessed. Discussion covers the legal and ethical licenses and constraints that provide a framework for intelligence development.

Law Enforcement Administration (3 Credits, CCJS 340)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 230. An introduction to organization and management in law enforcement. The objective is to communicate effectively and apply research skills and management and administrative principles to a law enforcement agency. Topics include structure, process, policy and procedure, communication and authority, division of work and organizational controls, the human element in the organization, and informal interaction in the context of bureaucracy. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 340 or CJUS 340.

Introduction to Security Management (3 Credits, CCJS 345)

(Formerly CCJS 445.) Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 230. A study of the history, concepts, principles, and methods of organizing and administering security management and loss prevention activities in industry, business, and government. The objective is to manage security duties, evaluate and apply risk management principles, and evaluate administrative and operational issues. Discussion covers both private and governmental risk assessment and management and the protection of assets, personnel, and facilities. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 345, CCJS 445, or CCJS 498G.

Juvenile Delinquency (3 Credits, CCJS 350)

(Fulfills the general education requirement in behavioral and social sciences.) Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 230. An examination of juvenile delinquency in relation to the general problem of crime. The aim is to apply theories and identify statutory parameters related to juvenile delinquency, analyze prevention measures, and assess the effectiveness of treatment measures. Topics include factors underlying juvenile delinquency, prevention of criminal acts by youths, and the treatment of delinquents. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 350 or CRIM 450.

Drugs and Crime (3 Credits, CCJS 352)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 230. An analysis of the role of criminal justice in controlling the use and abuse of drugs. The objective is to apply effective enforcement strategies, demonstrate case management skills, and analyze the effect of drug policy. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 352 or CJUS 352.

Victimology (3 Credits, CCJS 360)

(Fulfills the general education requirement in behavioral and social sciences.) Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 230. An overview of the history and theory of victimology in which patterns of victimization are analyzed, with emphasis on types of victims and of crimes. The aim is to identify and apply appropriate preventative measures and responses to victimization. Discussion covers the interaction between victims of crime and the system of criminal justice in terms of the role of the victim and the services that the victim is offered. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 360 or CRIM 360.

Ethical Behavior in Criminal Justice (3 Credits, CCJS 380)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 230. A survey of the standards for ethical behavior that guide criminal justice professionals in different roles and responsibilities. The aim is to make ethical decisions based on informed personal and accepted professional standards. Rules, laws, and codes of conduct are explored as a foundation for discussing individual ethical responsibilities.

Cyber Crime and Security (3 Credits, CCJS 390)

(Formerly CCJS 496.) Prerequisite: CCJS 100, CCJS 101, CCJS 105, or CSIA 310. Recommended: CCJS 234. An examination of crimes involving the use of computers. Topics include federal and state laws and investigative and preventive methods used to secure computers. Case studies emphasize security. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 390, CCJS 496, or CCJS 498C.

Analytical Strategies for Law Enforcement (3 Credits, CCJS 416)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100 or CCJS 105. An examination of the authenticity, accuracy, viability, and reliability of intelligence reports as they relate to the application of intelligence to public safety problem solving. The goal is to evaluate intelligence reports to formulate plans, policies, and procedures that ensure effective and efficient agency operations. Focus is on developing critical thinking and problem solving skills through role-playing in a simulated environment, working with near-genuine intelligence reports and public safety issues. Practice is provided in analyzing the strategies and activities detailed in intelligence reports, identifying and implementing responsive actions, and determining appropriate redistribution of such reports.

Medical and Legal Investigations of Death (3 Credits, CCJS 420)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100, CCJS 101, or CCJS 105. Recommended: CCJS 234. An intensive look at medical and legal investigations into causes of death. The objective is to perform investigative functions at a death scene, determine and apply forensic testing, and analyze and effectively communicate investigative information. Topics include the difference between the medical (or pathological) and legal (or criminal) components of investigations into causes of death, medical and investigative terminology, and the impact of ethics on prosecutions and convictions. Case studies illustrate practical applications of various forms of forensic styles and parameters.

Psychology of Criminal Behavior (3 Credits, CCJS 461)

Prerequisite: CCJS 100, CCJS 101, or CCJS 105. An overview of delinquent and criminal behavior from a developmental, cognitive-behavioral perspective. The aim is to apply theoretical perspectives (behavioral, emotional, and cognitive) to analyze real or hypothetical criminal scenarios; identify the various factors that encourage or discourage criminal behavior; and explain the use of risk assessment tools at various stages of the criminal justice process. Factors that influence the development of adults and juveniles on the road to crime are examined to assess culpability for criminal behavior. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 461 or CRIM 455.

Issues in Criminal Justice (3 Credits, CCJS 495)

(Intended as a final, capstone course for criminal justice degree majors; to be taken in a student’s last 15 credits). Prerequisites: 15 upper-level credits in CCJS. An integrative study of the various components of the American criminal justice system. The goal is to apply principles of interagency cooperation, critical thinking, and systems approaches to solve practical problems in a criminal justice environment. Topics include problem solving, case study analysis, strategic planning, teamwork, and professional writing.