Biology Courses

Courses in biology (designated BIOL) may be applied as appropriate (according to individual program requirements) toward

  • the general education requirement in the biological and physical sciences
  • a minor in biology
  • electives

Concepts of Biology (3 Credits, BIOL 101)

(For students not majoring in a science.) An introduction to the structure and function of living organisms. The objective is to use knowledge about biological principles and scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about the natural world. Topics include the chemical foundations of life, cell biology, genetics, evolution, ecosystems, and interdependence of living organisms. Discussion also covers the importance of the scientific method to biological inquiry and the impact of biological knowledge and technology on human societies. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 101, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.

Laboratory in Biology (1 Credits, BIOL 102)

(For students not majoring in a science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 101.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 101. A hands-on study of the structure and function of living organisms. The goal is to apply the scientific method and to use scientific and quantitative reasoning to make informed decisions about experimental results in the biological sciences. Laboratory exercises emphasize the scientific method and explore topics such as the chemical foundations of living organisms, cell structure and function, and the classification of organisms. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 102, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.

Introduction to Biology (4 Credits, BIOL 103)

(Not open to students who have completed BIOL 101 or BIOL 102. For students not majoring in a science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) An introduction to the structure and function of living organisms. The aim is to apply the scientific method and use scientific and quantitative reasoning to make informed decisions about experimental results in the biological sciences. Topics include the chemical foundations of life, cell biology, genetics, evolution, ecosystems, and interdependence of living organisms. Discussion also covers the importance of the scientific method to biological inquiry and the impact of biological knowledge and technology on human societies. Laboratory activities emphasize the scientific method. Students may receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 101 and BIOL 102, BIOL 103, BIOL 105, or BSCI 105.

Human Biology (3 Credits, BIOL 160)

(Science background not required.) A general introduction to human structure, functions, genetics, evolution, and ecology. The aim is to use scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about topics related to human biology. The human organism is examined from the basic cellular level and genetics, through organ systems, to interaction with the outside world. Discussion also covers pertinent health topics. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 160 or GNSC 160.

Laboratory in Human Biology (1 Credits, BIOL 161)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 160.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 160. A laboratory study that uses the human organism as an example to illustrate the concepts underlying the organization and interrelationships of all living organisms.

Life in the Oceans (3 Credits, BIOL 181)

An introductory study of the major groups of plants and animals in various marine environments, as well as their interactions with each other and the nonliving components of the ocean. The objective is to use scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about topics related to marine biology. Discussion covers the impact of human activity on life in the ocean and the potential uses and misuses of the ocean. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 181 or ZOOL 181.

Marine Biology Laboratory (1 Credits, BIOL 182)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 181 or NSCI 110.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 181 or NSCI 110. An introduction to the environmental and biological factors that affect life in the oceans, including chemical and physical properties such as salinity, oxygen concentration, depth, tides, currents, and light. The investigations may include field exercises examining life in specific habitats, such as coral reefs, estuaries, and intertidal areas.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 Credits, BIOL 201)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 105, BIOL 160, or BSCI 105. A thorough introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems of human beings. An overview of cellular physiology is included. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 201 or ZOOL 201.

Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 Credits, BIOL 202)

(Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 101, BIOL 105, BIOL 160, or BSCI 105. An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the sensory, cardiovascular, endocrine, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, excretory, immune, and reproductive systems. Intermediary metabolism and endocrine relationships are also studied. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 202 or ZOOL 202.

Environmental Science (3 Credits, BIOL 211)

A survey of ecological principles as they apply to the interrelated dilemmas of sustainability. Topics include overpopulation, pollution, over-consumption of natural resources, and the ethics of land use. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 211, BOTN 211, or PBIO 235.

Environmental Science Laboratory (1 Credits, BIOL 212)

(For students not majoring in science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement only with previous or concurrent credit for BIOL 211.) Prerequisite or corequisite: BIOL 211. A laboratory study investigating human interactions with our environment. Scientific objectivity and methodology are employed to gather and analyze data pertaining to the varied and interrelated forms of human environmental impact. Topics explored include principles of ecology, population dynamics, food supply alternatives and impact, sustainable water supplies, energy alternatives, pollution control, greenhouse gases, recycling, and conservation technologies.

General Microbiology (4 Credits, BIOL 230)

(For students majoring or minoring in a science. Fulfills the laboratory science requirement.) Prerequisite: BIOL 105 or other introductory biology course with laboratory. An investigation of fundamental concepts in morphology, physiology, genetics, immunology, ecology, and pathogenic microbiology. Applications of microbiology to medicine, the food industry, and biotechnology are considered. Student may receive credit for only one of the following: BIOL 230, BIOL 302, BIOL 331, BIOL 398G, BSCI 223, MICB 200, or MICB 388A.

Human Health and Disease (3 Credits, BIOL 301)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) A survey of the mechanisms of disease and their expression in major organ systems of the human body. The goal is to use scientific reasoning to make informed decisions about matters related to human biology and health. Topics include infections, cancer, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, stroke, malnutrition, poisoning by environmental toxins, stress, inflammation, disorders of the immune system, and aging. Emphasis is on analysis of factors that cause disruption of healthy body functions leading to disease, and on prevention of disease through control of risk factors and early detection. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 301 or BIOL 398H.

Bacteria, Viruses, and Health (3 Credits, BIOL 302)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) An introductory study of the basic structure, genetic and regulatory systems, and life cycles of bacteria and viruses and how they relate to health, infectious disease, and illness. The objective is to apply knowledge of cellular and molecular processes and communicate synthesized knowledge of microbial pathogenesis and disease prevention methods. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 230, BIOL 302, BIOL 331, BIOL 398G, BSCI 223, MICB 200, or MICB 388A.

The Biology of Cancer (3 Credits, BIOL 304)

(For students majoring in both science and nonscience disciplines.) An overview of the biological basis of cancer. The goal is to apply knowledge of cancer biology to adopt appropriate lifestyle strategies and evaluate current treatments. The causes, development, and progression of cancer are considered at the level of cell structure and function. The roles of genes and proteins are also examined. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: BIOL 304 or GNSC 398C.